Breakin’ the Rules

In the days before security lines, body screening, sardine-can seating, and puny five-dollar bags of almonds, there was a romance to flying. There were real glasses from which to sip wine and brandy. There were five-star meals in first class. Flying was seen as something that only adventurous, wealthy, sophisticated people did. But gradually, the world changed, and the airlines changed along with it. Once the airborne equivalent of the Love Boat, an airplane is now barely more than a subway car in the sky. In many respects, the high idealism of the middle twentieth century is going the way of the airlines’ golden age. A lot of people are beginning to realize that there’s more to life than what we've been shown. The material wealth and security of the American Dream is an empty shell. Happiness can’t be with hard work. The clothes don’t make the man (or the woman) , nor does the house, the car or the iPhone. Instant gratification doesn't equal lasting contentment. 

In other words, The Rules aren't serving us anymore. Maybe they never did.

When we realize this, not only intellectually but wholly, we take the first steps toward a new way of being. When we wake up, we begin to see that there is more to life than what our five senses tell us --more than what can be counted or controlled in the form of material things. Just as if we were flying, we rise above the daily dos and don’ts and the limiting structure of The Rules to gain a clearer perspective. We learn that who we are doesn’t depend on the house we live in, the clothes we wear, the person we sleep with, or even the way our friends view us. Rather, we discover that we are all part of a single universal whole.     

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